Foo Fighters Go Bump In The Night With THERAPY CONTENT-Produced Video for “THE SKY IS A NEIGHBORHOOD”

August 23rd, 2017

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Therapy Content helps Foo Fighters bring a dose of mystical danger to a cabin in the woods with the new video for “The Sky Is A Neighborhood.”

The Dave Grohl-directed video opens on two young girls reading an ancient-looking tome in a remote cabin, before transitioning to the band playing in the woods at nighttime. Cutting between the performance footage and the girls’ story, Foo Fighters are revealed to be the thing that goes bump in the night when the kick drum and stomping feet rattle the roof above the girls’ heads. As the song escalates, the action of the video does as well; when the band stomps holes through the roof of the cabin, they create a starscape inside to mirror the outside. Throughout the song, the band members’ eyes flash a possessed white, revealing they are not an impartial narrator to the supernatural occurrences happening below.

“The Sky Is A Neighborhood” is another brick in the long and successful collaborative bridge between musician/director Dave Grohl and Therapy Content. The Los Angeles-based entertainment development and production company was behind Grohl’s feature film debut (led by Therapy Content’s John Ramsay and Jim Rota) with the Grammy-winning 2013 documentary Sound City. They followed it up with the Emmy and Grammy-winning collaboration: the HBO docuseries Sonic Highways, along with Foo Fighters’ most recent video for “Run.”

Therapy Content handled the scope of production, nailing the horror/handmade atmosphere that makes the video so unique. To achieve this, Therapy built a full-scale cabin on a soundstage, which took five days and required truckloads of actual trees to create the surrounding forest. To make the starscape, Therapy animated and projected the night sky onto a 40-foot tall by 150-foot wide screen wrapped around the entire set, which required over 20 projectors to cover the screen.

Sister company Therapy Studios was enlisted to handle the post production. Editor Kristin McCasey expertly weaves a sense of suspense and mystery between the two worlds. Meanwhile Lead Flame Artist Rachel Moorer and colorist Omar Inguanzo enhance the physical set of the video through glowing eyes, holes in the ceiling, and multicolored lights from above.